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Top mp3s of the Week (7/20)

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    mp3s 4 e1333124415256 Top mp3s of the Week (7/20)

    “You are the music while the music lasts.” -T.S. Eliot

    Jerry Douglas feat. Paul Simon & Mumford and Sons – “The Boxer” (Simon and Garfunkle Cover)

    CD ETM2128 Top mp3s of the Week (7/20)

    On his latest solo album, Traveler, instrumentalist Jerry Douglas joins with folk up-and-comers Mumford & Sons and genre legend Paul Simon for a cover of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Boxer”. While the original recording is whispery and understated, this version cranks the volume. The song’s momentous buildup reaches a climax when Marcus Mumford (who sings lead on the track) harmonizes with Simon during the “lie la lie” refrain. Douglas’ acoustic arrangement is dense, and he plays with tact befitting such a classic song. -Jon Hadusek

    Green Day – “Oh Love”

    green day oh love Top mp3s of the Week (7/20)

    Billy Joe Armstrong described Green Day’s upcoming trilogy of albums as “punchier, more power pop – somewhere between AC/DC and the early Beatles.” This seems to be an apt comparison based on “Oh Love”, the anthemic lead single from Uno!, which is due out September 25th on Reprise. Based on this track, Green Day has ostensibly traded political slants and operatic pretentions for power chords and sugary melodies. It’s a refreshing slice of verse-chorus-verse pop that’s sure to find a home on FM airwaves. -Jon Hadusek

    How to Dress Well – “Cold Nites”

    how to dress well total loss 1 e1342533384219 Top mp3s of the Week (7/20)

    The ambient, electronic skew on R&B that Brooklyn’s Tom Krell releases under the moniker How To Dress Well continues to grow more confident with each new track. And now, on “Cold Nites”, the second track from Krell’s upcoming sophomore LP, Total Loss (due September 18th via Acéphale), there’s an undeniably smooth swagger to the percussion and lilting piano. The teaser video that the tune plays over is perfect accompaniment, vague flashes of sultry skin moving slowly along with the loping piano line. Krell’s haunting harmonizing and the stuttered electric percussion at the track’s climax are chilling, an exciting taste of the album to come. -Adam Kivel

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