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The cost of a real-life Jurassic Park would be more than NASA’s annual operating budget

Jurassic World may be the biggest opener ever, but did it make enough to pay for an actual dinosaur park

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    Despite mixed reviews, Jurassic World is a certified smash, earning a record-breaking $208,800,000 in its opening weekend. Though that may be the largest domestic opening ever, it takes but a compsognathus-sized bite out of what it would cost to make a real-life Jurassic Park.

    Fandango went and crunched the numbers to see what it would theoretically cost to open a theme park populated by cloned dinosaurs, including the cost of land ($10 billion for two Costa Rican islands totaling 66 square miles), park construction ($1.5 billion based on the average cost of the world’s largest theme parks), and legal fees ($300,000 per lawyer). Of course, you’d have to populate the park with actual animals, and that starts with mining amber for dino DNA at a cost of about $9 million. From there, building the creatures would require surrogates, embryo development, stem-cell research, and gene modification, plus the actual cloning. All of that would cost just about $8.5 million, which actually sounds pretty inexpensive, all things considered.

    Operating expenses ($32 million a day) and dinosaur care (about $567,123 a day) were also taken into account, bringing the grand total to a staggering $23,432,400,000. And that’s just to get Jurassic Park up and running; the annual operating budget would be $11,907,000,000 to keep it going. For comparison, NASA’s annual operating budget is around $18 billion.

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    (Page to Screen: A Tale of Two Jurassic Parks)

    Some of the calculations used aren’t exactly the most sound (if it costs $150,000 to clone a dog, wouldn’t it cost exponentially more for a dino made from DNA extracted from a mosquito? Wouldn’t Isla Nublar be cheaper because of the constant cloud coverage?), but it’s still a pretty deeply researched calculation. The only question left is who’s going to be the one to run the Kickstarter?

    Watch the video explanation below.

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