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Fantastic Negrito detained by police after intern sold Outside Lands wristband on Craigslist

Oakland musician says he was "treated like an animal."

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    Oakland-based roots musician Xavier Dphrepaulezz, aka Fantastic Negrito, was detained shortly before his Outside Lands performance after an associate of his group was found to be illegally selling VIP tickets on Craigslist.

    On Saturday afternoon, Dphrepaulezz approached the entrance of Golden Gate Park expecting to find a golf cart waiting to transport him to the stage. Instead, he was met by 10 members of the local police department, who promptly handcuffed Dphrepaulezz without explanation. Eventually, he was informed that he would no longer be performing at the festival due to a VIP wristband that was sold on Craigslist by one of his label’s interns, who was present with him at the scene.

    Speaking with Consequence of Sound about the ordeal, Dphrepaulezz described the experience as “being treated like an animal.” After being handcuffed, he was forced to the ground. Eventually he was removed from the park grounds and detained for three hours before being released with a citation for “peddling without a permit.” As to how the SFPD has jurisdiction over a wristband’s sale on a third-party website, Dphrepaulezz admits he “has absolutely no idea.”

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    “The incident is over now. I don’t even hold it against the intern. He’s a good kid. As soon as he saw what was going down, he manned up and took responsibility. I don’t have anything to do with tickets or wristbands to these things — I’m too focused on the performance to keep track of those things.”

    The festival’s comments have been limited to its Ranger Dave Twitter account, which tweeted, “ranger dave wants to let you know @MusicNegrito can’t make the set today but @RonFunches @roryscovel and @DrennonDavis are filling in” about 20 minutes before Negrito himself tweeted “Detained by SFPD.”

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    While artists selling their complimentary tickets is certainly a taboo practice, it is difficult to see how such an act, especially one not committed by the artist himself, could so rapidly escalate into police action and a cancelled performance.

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