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Eluvium unearths eight-minute song “Neighboring In Telescopes” — listen

Prolific ambient producer preps second volume of rarities and unreleased material

Neighboring In Telescopes
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    For over 10 years, Eluvium’s Matthew Cooper has composed music that feels fit to soundtrack the celestial bodies above us. His ambient soundscapes have veered toward epic heights since his 2003 debut Lambent Material. When including work he’s released under different monikers and projects such as Inventions, his catalog feels almost as expansive as space itself.

    Now Cooper is extending his musical universe even further with a new box set called Life Through Bombardmen Vol 2, out December 18th via Temporary Residence Ltd. The set starts where the first volume left off, featuring all the albums Cooper has recorded since 2009, plus a bonus record featuring rare and previously unreleased material. Ahead of the release, he’s shared one such rarity called “Neighboring In Telescopes”. Despite the cosmic name, the song has roots much literally closer to Cooper’s earthly home.

    “The title is a nod to a nice person that lives down the street from us,” Cooper tells Consequence of Sound. “He is into astronomy, and we’ll be out walking the dogs at night and he’ll call over to us and ask if we want to see something cool and so we stop and he pets the dogs and we look through his giant contraptions at some celestial phenomenon occurring in the sky, and it makes you feel a certain something and you are glad he is there, and glad that you were walking by, and that he chose to show you this beautiful momentary happening.”

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    As has come to be expected with Cooper’s work, the song is a gorgeous, swooning epic that incites the imagination. The song soars throughout its eight-minute duration, rolling snares and shivering guitar tremolos lifting up through waves of distortion. Each passing second seems to grow and grow, building into a monolithic proclamation of post-rock haze. It’s easy to imagine the view from Cooper’s neighbor’s telescope, capturing the wonder of the outer world before inevitably having to come back down to our pale blue dot.

    Listen in below.

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