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Top 10 Songs of the Week (4/15)

We've got quite the international set of tunes for you this week!

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    We’ve got quite the international set of tunes for you this week! The artists featured on this list hail from places including Japan, The Netherlands, and South Korea. While the tunes cover a lot of geographic space, they cover an even more vast stretch of the genre map, from drone metal to funky hip-hop. Yet that’s the great thing about music — you can learn about all these different places, sounds, and styles, and no need for a valid passport.

    10. Cubicolor feat. Tim Digby-Bell – “Mirror Play”

    cubicolor Top 10 Songs of the Week (4/15)

    The Netherlands’ Ariaan Olieroock and Peter Kriek joined forces just over two year ago as Cubicolor, and the duo quickly started climbing the evocative deep progressive ranks. After being championed by Pete Tong as an “Artist To Watch” in 2015, Olieroock and Kriek saw massive support from the genre’s mainstage closers and garnered 2.5 million Spotify streams for their “Falling” single alongside Duologue’s Tim Digby-Bell. The trio has once again united for “Mirror Play”, where Digby-Bell’s haunting vocals pierce the producers’ dominant atmospheric low-end and subtle key/acoustic guitar interplay. The single is set for release this spring via Above & Beyond’s aurally expansive Anjunadeep imprint. –Derek Staples

    And courtesy of our friends at Soundstage Direct, you can get discounted vinyl with the code: CS12

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    09. Jackie Lynn – “Alien Love”

    circuit des yeux jackie lynn haley fohr Top 10 Songs of the Week (4/15)

    When I first heard news about Jackie Lynn, I wondered whether the secret of her identity would be kept throughout her album’s release. The new alter ego of Circuit Des Yeux’s Haley Fohr appears in press photos with a red wig, cowboy hat, and ventilator face mask, and the rollout included a detailed backstory of an outlaw cocaine dealer on the run with her partner in crime, Tom Strong. But duh: With that unique voice, there’s no way you could keep that secret. Luckily, Fohr’s voice is expansive and expressive enough to convey an entirely separate identity on her first single as Jackie Lynn, the propulsive “Alien Love”. Along with some limber bass, retro synths, and a tinny drum machine loop, Fohr does her magic, specifically letting her resonant voice color in the empty spaces with evocative detail. For more of this impeccable character work, Jackie Lynn will be available June 10 on Thrill Jockey Records. —Adam Kivel

    08. The Julie Ruin – “I Decide”

    the julie ruin band 2016 Top 10 Songs of the Week (4/15)

    “I Decide”, pulled from The Julie Ruin’s forthcoming sophomore album, Hit Resetis a statement on an often-overlooked basic human right — to dictate one’s own narrative. Penned by punk pioneer Kathleen Hanna, the single continues her ethos of upbeat feminist songwriting: “You might be a thorn I witnessed, to pain I just need to co-exist with, but I … I’ll decide.” Grab Hit Reset July 8th via Hardly Art. –Derek Staples

    07. William Tyler – “Gone Clear”

    Nina Corcoran, William Tyler 1

    Photo by Nina Corcoran

    Anyone who’s traveled into the depths of America’s landscapes knows that the quiet areas of nature — be it an expansive stretch of desert or the thick fog that can fill a forest — are undescribably magical. There’s a life of its own that takes over, telling you to sit down and listen. You don’t know what for at first, but suddenly it overtakes you. The world becomes sharper, the dirt around you breathes, and the air seems full of fresh smells. As if by holstering that very magic, William Tyler accomplishes similar feats on “Gone Clear”, the lead single off his upcoming LP, Modern Country, out June 3rd. The song, like the rest of his work, is an artful exploration of instrumental music, showcasing his rich fingerpicking with new accompaniment from percussive add-ons. Listen to it in full and close your eyes; then try to tell us you didn’t spend six minutes totally caught up in the beauty of our planet. — Nina Corcoran

    06. Action Bronson feat. Jah Tiger and Meyhem Lauren – “Bottleships”

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    Earlier this week, Action Bronson, rapper turned culinary aficionado, went on Late Night with Seth Meyers to whip up some octopus to promote his Viceland food series, Fuck That’s Delicious. During the show, he mentioned his follow-up to 2013’s Blue Chips 2 with upcoming mixtape Blue Chips 7000, and a day after he dropped a track off the mixtape, a reggae-inflected cut, “Mr. 2 Face”, featuring regular collaborator Meyhem Lauren. Proving once again that you can never go wrong with a Herbie Hancock sample, the song riffs off the thick bass funk of “Watermelon Man” as subtle plucked guitar strokes coalesce with Jah Tiger’s infectious “I’m Mr. 2 Face” hook. –Alejandra Ramirez

    05. Weaves – “Candy”

    Nina Corcoran, Weaves 2

    Photo by Nina Corcoran

    The latest cut from Toronto’s Weaves, “Candy”, ricochets through a field of noise, Jasmyn Burke’s unruly yet approachable voice bobbing above the waves. They sound, at times, like Micachu, though with the ramshackle thrift-store instrumentation replaced with rusty guitars and bouncy synth. Or maybe like a slightly sedated Guerilla Toss. Or, more accurately, they sound a lot like Weaves: quirky and unpredictable and vicious and sweet. They’ve sounded powerful in the past, but “Candy” hints at the absolute power of a live band working off of each other and finding the moment — and then laughing with a gleeful mania. Weaves’ self-titled album drops 6/17 on Kanine/Buzz/Memphis Industries. –Adam Kivel

    04. DJ Shadow feat. Run the Jewels – “Nobody Speak”

    dj shadow the mountain will fall album run jewels Top 10 Songs of the Week (4/15)

    DJ Shadow announced last week the release of his newest album in five years, The Mountain Will Fall, which will drop June 24th via Mass Appeal. With the announcement came a treatment of the celestial title track with all its oscillating electronics and sweeping scoring feel. Now, Josh Davis has released another single off the album entitled “Nobody Speak”, featuring cacophonous duo Run the Jewels. The song coalesces big brass horns and woozy looped guitars, with erratic electronics while the abrasive duo brands their virulent and tongue-in-cheek lyricism as El-P spits, “Flame your crew quicker than Trump fucks his youngest.” –Alejandra Ramirez

    03. Shugo Tokumaru – “Vektor”

    Shugo Tokumaru

    Growing up, nothing seemed more terrifying than the fact that age strips away your creativity, your imagination, your youth. As I grew up, it became clear that parting ways with your inner child was possible, but not mandatory. Japanese multi-instrumentalist Shugo Tokumaru not only brings his toddler days back to life through music, but he inspires listeners to do the same. The avant-pop genius brings his usual bag of tricks out on “Vektor”, the B-side to single “Hikageno” due out April 20th. Toy xylophone, plastic recorders, wooden flutes, and more pick up right where his last release, 2012’s phenomenal In Focus?, left off. Tokumaru is the master of experimental quirks, and “Vektor” reminds us of his commitment to reviving child-like curiosity and exuberant joy to suggest we do the same. Adulthood doesn’t have to be boring. –Nina Corcoran

    02. Tricot – “Setsuyaku-ka”

    Tricot

    Math rock turns too many people off by the genre’s term, then too many people off by the nitty-gritty theory behind it. If either of those holds true for you, this is the exact moment where you throw away those thoughts. The endlessly catchy work of Kyoto, Japan-based trio Tricot finds a middle ground for theory nerds and music aficionados alike. With five-track EP Kabuku! set to drop April 27th, the three have shared “Setsuyaku-Ka”, a feverish single that scurries after modulations while still showcasing their ridiculous talent in a pop-punk light. The drums are blistering, the vocals stay light, and the guitars sprint in dizzying directions without trying to out-do themselves. In simple terms, “Setsuyaku-ka” is the coolest song you’ll hear all week. –Nina Corcoran

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