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Shaky Knees Music Festival 2016 Review: From Worst to Best

Atlanta’s best music festival keeps the spirit alive in Centennial Olympic Park

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    Shaky Knees Music Festival began as a modest two-day event at Atlanta’s Masquerade (an iconic venue now set for demolition) and has grown into a full-on festival drawing patrons and bands from all over the world. Descending upon Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park, this marks the festival’s fourth location in four years of operation, making it hard to get too bogged down with bummer logistical issues like stage distance and easier to remain hopeful that the bones of the festival —the attention to the lineup from top to bottom, the diverse age groups in attendance, the convenience of the fest to in-town Atlanta — are the aspects of the weekend that are here to stay.

    As big corporations like Goldenvoice and Live Nation (or, in this case, Live Nation subsidiary C3) continue to gobble up independent festivals, it might be time to shake the doom-and-gloom stance on the acquisition of fests and look at the way an event can maintain its identity even with a big company behind the scenes.

    misc 0155 Shaky Knees Music Festival 2016 Review: From Worst to Best
    Photo by Carlo Cavaluzzi

    In this increasingly corporatized festival landscape, Shaky Knees is a hopeful sign that a festival can still have a distinct hometown vibe, and music lovers would be wise to watch fests of this size and situation closely to see where the industry as a whole is headed. Shaky Knees’ distinct identity has a lot to do with founder and longtime Atlanta promoter Tim Sweetwood’s continued role at the helm: You could hear it in the personal thank-yous from artists on the stage, many of whom played this festival in one band or another over the last three years. You saw it in the festival stages themselves, which continued to be named after iconic Atlanta streets rather than big-name sponsors. Most of all, you felt it in the pride taken in the bottom of the bill, where the investment in young talent was made obvious by the fact that up-and-comers like Hop Along and Day Wave played the same stages as headline-rivals Walk the Moon and The 1975.

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    While we can’t help but hope that next year the fest returns to the shady, easy-to-navigate green goodness of last year’s location at Atlanta’s Central Park, Shaky Knees 2016 held plenty of memorable performances. Here are the 35 sets we made it to this weekend, from worst to best.

    –Dacey Orr
    Contributing Writer

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    Crystal Fighters

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    Photo by Philip Cosores

    From their culturally confusing outfits to the parrots and vines that dominated their onstage imagery, it would be impossible for the uninitiated to discern not only where Crystal Fighters are from, but even what the hell they are going for with their act. The music doesn’t help, fusing African and Latin rhythms with ass-shaking EDM bass. Yes, the five-piece sells it. Their entire performance was built around selling it by any means possible. It’s music that’s designed for outdoor festivals (or dance collaborations, as their best-known song to date is a pairing with Feed Me), but it fails to hold up to any reasonable questioning about cultural appropriation or basic good taste. Plus, any band that makes a bigger deal about their spiritual home (Basque Country) than their actual home is a straight sell. –Philip Cosores


    Ghost

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    Photo by Philip Cosores

    The Eyes Wide Shut of metal offer little more than their costumes and the mystery that surrounds them. Musically, Ghost is a bit of a slog, with the five-piece too obscured by their masks to really connect with the audience. Even frontman Papa Emeritus III (don’t ask), the only specter to don a painted face rather than a full-blown demon head, plays his set stoically and cold, living the role he has created. Yes, this is all intentional, but on Friday evening, in front of a crowd of The 1975 fans that patiently awaited their headliner, it didn’t really work for an audience unaware of the band’s mythology. The doomy mid-tempo tunes failed to endear the band leaving little more than a gimmick and some played-out religious iconography. –Philip Cosores


    Jane’s Addiction

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    Photo by Carlo Cavaluzzi

    Jane’s Addiction will surely collect accolades after Friday’s Shaky Knees set for being so many decades in and still approaching their performances with vigor and excitement, and for good reason: a band that has accomplished so much in their career deserves a certain level of respect. That said, there were multiple puzzling aspects of the performance, not the least of which was Perry Farrell, who felt tired on the high notes and seemed heavily reliant on the shock factor of his backup dancers (which included his wife), who spent the set everywhere from grinding on the aging lead singer to, towards the end, swinging limply from cables.

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    Farrell didn’t seem to be in touch with the crowd at all, playing tough-guy about the “hard curfew” before the set was even near ending and promising concertgoers he would help them find “a happy whore to take home to mama.” The lighting and instrumentals were on-point, but maybe 2016 is not the time to revolve your show around using women as props, and maybe 27 minutes before your set is over is not the time to act tough about running over curfew. The set ended early, presumably expecting an encore, but the crowd filed right out. –Dacey Orr


    Deftones

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    Photo by Philip Cosores

    Riding high with a return to form album, Gore, the scene was set on Sunday evening for Deftones to demonstrate why they have transcended the nu-metal white pony they rode in on in the ’90s. And if it were just based on energy, with frontman Chino Moreno and bassist Sergio Vega boisterously flinging themselves across a fog-drenched stage, the set might have proved successful. The problem was that the band just didn’t sound good. A rager like “My Own Summer (Shove It)” doesn’t need much finesse, but many of the group’s other tunes do, with “Be Quiet and Drive (Far Away)” getting lost in the muddy sound and “Knife Prty” barely recognizable outside of guitarist Stephen Carpenter’s unmistakable lead in. Deftones are still an endearing band even when not sounding their bestl Moreno’s stage presence and dopey grin sell the aggressive tunes, despite the occasional unfortunate “yeah bitch” or “get it, girl” exclamation. For the casual observer, though, it wasn’t a performance to be won over by. –Philip Cosores


    Bloc Party

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    Photo by Carlo Cavaluzzi

    Bloc Party has a spread-out but large and devoted fan base, and throngs of them showed up for the English indie rockers’ sunset performance on night one. The band’s latest record, Hymns, was widely regarded as a return to form after dabbling in a more electronic sound, and while surely longtime fans found something in their Shaky Knees performance, the band’s hour-long set on the festival’s main stage felt a bit like a band going through the motions. But as they drew from the new record on songs like “Virtue” and peppered the setlist with standard numbers like “Banquet”, frontman Kele Okereke’s vocals were unwaveringly on-point, and his eyes gleamed with an intensity that made a strong case as to why this band continues to land big gigs. –Dacey Orr


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