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The Stone Roses’ Ian Brown Refuses to Play Festival With Mandatory Vaccination Policy

Brown previously called COVID-19 a "plandemic" that's making us "digital slaves"

Ian Brown Refuses to Play Festival Attendees Have to be Vaccinated For neighbourhood watch
Ian Brown, photo by Killian Young
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    Ian Brown has said a lot of crazy shit about the coronavirus. In a bizarre Twitter rant last fall, the former Stone Roses frontman called COVID-19 a “plandemic” that’s making us “digital slaves”, and he shared a new solo song that fleshed out his worldview into 5G microchip territory. Since then, he’s continued to blather conspiratorial nonsense on Twitter, and now he’s putting his money where his mouth is.

    As of today, the English musician has stepped down as the headliner of an upcoming UK festival because attendees are required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination. The 58-year-old was slated to headline the second night of a three-day festival called Neighbourhood Weekender, but after organizers announced that they’re pushing the fest back to September and that attendees will have to show proof that they’re vaccinated, Brown has dropped off.

    “My Saturday night headline show at NHBD Weekender Festival will now not happen!” he wrote on Twitter. “I refuse to accept vaccination proof as condition of entry. Refunds are available! X”

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    As NME points out, this isn’t a spur-of-the-moment decision for Brown, who dropped his last solo album, Ripples, in 2019. Last week, the Madchester icon seemed to know what was coming and released a public dispatch proclaiming that he’ll “NEVER sing to a crowd who must be vaccinated as a condition of attendance. NEVER EVER!”

    Fellow Manchester veterans James have replaced Brown as the night’s headliner. Other artists on the bill include Catfish and the Bottlemen, The Wombats, Sam Fender, and Gerry Cinnamon.

    Editor’s note: We’re offering a free two-pack of face masks with the purchase of any premium mask pack. Proceeds from each sale benefit independent musicians and venues impacted by the pandemic through charities such as MusiCares and NIVA.

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