Advertisement

Denis Villeneuve “Would Deeply Love” to Make a James Bond Movie

"It would be a big challenge to try and reboot it after what Daniel did"

Denis Villeneuve James Bond
Denis Villeneuve, photo via Getty
Advertisement
Advertisement

    For the first time in 007 history, we have a James Bond movie directed by an American. Now that California native Cary Fogi Fukunaga’s No Time to Die has finally hit theaters, the door seems open for fellow Americans filmmakers to speculate about their own take on 007, including Denis Villeneuve.

    In a new interview on the podcast Happy. Sad. Confused.Villeneuve discussed his longtime dream to direct an installment in the Bond franchise, saying it would be “a privilege” and “pure cinematic joy.” “I would deeply love one day to make a James Bond movie,” the Dune director said. “It’s a character that I’ve been with since my childhood. I have massive affection for Bond. It would be a big challenge to try and reboot it after what Daniel did.”

    Villeneuve continued to rave about Daniel Craig, who’s held the role of James Bond for over a decade: “What Daniel Craig brought to Bond was so unique and strong and honestly unmatchable. He’s the ultimate James Bond. I can’t wait to see Cary’s movie. I’m very excited. I’m one of the biggest Bond fans.”

    Advertisement

    Considering Villeneuve’s adaptation of Dune is due out later this month, another blockbuster action film doesn’t seem too far outside his wheelhouse. Plus, with films ranging from Sicario to Blade Runner 2049, he clearly has the range to do an intriguing and action-packed spy thriller.

    Following a few delays, No Time to Die is in theaters now at last. In his review for Consequence, Clint Worthington writes, “It’s the 25th Bond movie, the farewell bow to a respected actor who redefined the role in myriad ways, and also an acknowledgment that both the series and the character need to adapt to the times. In juggling all those balls, it drops a few, and grows more than a little fatigued by the time that two-hour mark hits. Fukunaga’s direction is crisp and assured, if occasionally languid, and the script creaks under the weight of its myriad responsibilities to both its star and franchise.”

Personalized Stories

Advertisement