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Geese’s Debut Album Projector Brilliantly Oscillates Between Anxiety and Euphoria

Our November Artist of the Month's brand of progressive indie rock is wholly accessible and deeply fun

geese projector review
Geese, photo by Daniel Topete
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    In typical New York City fashion, Geese hails, essentially, from a basement. But unlike the current trend of bedroom pop and indie stars turning into NYC phenomena via a solo project, Geese are doing so with five members.

    Packed into an undoubtedly sweaty basement studio in Brooklyn — appropriately dubbed “The Nest” by the band — Geese have formulated their magnificent debut album Projector, out Friday, October 29th, and arrived with a fully realized sound, an impressive command over their instruments, and a few (virgin) cocktails worth of energy.

    Though the members of Geese — who are also Consequence‘s November Artist of the Month — have only recently graduated high school, their tightly-composed sound and progressive instrumentation suggests that they’ve been playing music forever. Comparisons between Britain’s black midi have been thrown around a great deal — partly due to the fact that Projector was mixed by Dan Carey, who helmed black midi’s remarkable debut Schlagenheim. And while that comparison is not unfounded, Geese seem to be entirely in their own lane.

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    Projector features the sound of a young band following every avenue they’re interested in, all without losing their essence: interlocking guitar parts, quick tempo and feel changes, explosions and implosions when you least expect them. And where bands like Squid and black midi lean so heavily into math rock that it can be hard to digest, Geese’s brand of progressive indie rock is wholly accessible and deeply fun.

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