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How 2021 Band of the Year CHVRCHES Navigated a COVID-Challenged Galaxy

Lauren Mayberry, Iain Cook, and Martin Doherty on their triumphant 2021, getting back into touring, the reality of playing shows in the pandemic

CHVRCHES band of the year interview
CHVRCHES, photo by Sebastian Mlynarski & Kevin J Thomson
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    Our 2021 Annual Report continues with the announcement of CHVRCHES as our Band of the Year. As the year winds down, stay tuned for more awards, lists, and articles about the best music, film, and TV of 2021. You can find it all in one place here.


    The last couple of years have undoubtedly been chaotic — and while many artists have used these uncertain times to provide a distraction, others, like CHVRCHES, our 2021 Band of the Year, have embraced that chaos to create profound and inspired works.

    CHVRCHES’ fourth studio album, Screen Violence, features the band working at the highest level since their debut, and with a little bit of cinematic horror and drama added to the mix, they sound like a band renewed. Tracks like “How Not To Drown (featuring Robert Smith),” which landed at No. 8 on our Top Songs of 2021 list, and “Asking For A Friend,” which hearkens back to an older CHVRCHES formula but with even more tact and vibrance, epitomize this odd, ever-changing year. Through the unavoidable fear and anxiety, there’s a powerful sense of determination and focus that elevates these songs to a cathartic level.

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    Chatting with Lauren Mayberry, Iain Cook, and Martin Doherty, they appear always to be a close-knit, deeply united trio — though Cook joined the Zoom call separately from a hotel in Chicago, as he had to remain quarantined following a positive COVID test during their run of shows last month.

    Fortunately, Cook recovered and rejoined the band in New York City for the last stretch of their North American tour. Their live show has taken on a Screen Violence-inspired makeover, complete with horror pre-show soundtracks, trippy visuals, and blood-drenched makeup and costume changes from Mayberry. All the while, the band is dedicated to COVID safety protocols, undoubtedly setting the example for what it looks like to responsibly tour amid a global pandemic.

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    Screen Violence features themes of isolation and anguish, perhaps best represented by the carnage of the pandemic and the separation forced on the three members of the band (Doherty and Mayberry were quarantined in California, whereas Cook was stuck in his native Scotland). Yet, whether it be virtually or in person, they came together as a band with hope, determination and vigor, and the resulting album is their most powerful and united statement.

    Below, our Band of the Year discusses their triumphant 2021, getting back into touring, the reality of playing shows in the pandemic, and more.


    It’s been a few months now since the release of Screen Violence. What has the reception from fans been like? Any nice comments or things that stuck out to you when people were responding to the album?

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    Martin Doherty: I think I never really noticed it until we took it onto the road, I think that’s where I really noticed it. From the first gig, the first song “He Said She Said,” how loud people were singing back the first line, because the song kind of drops in, and then you can hear the first line… when the crowd sang it back, I was like, “Oh fuck.”

    That’s more than I was expecting, because you don’t usually hear them in the in-ear monitors. The kind of energy of every gig has been, to be honest, the most craziest gigs we’ve ever done. The response to the new music… I feel thankful and lucky for that because it hasn’t always worked out that way.

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