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Rap Song of the Week: Baby Tate Teaches You How to “Sl*t Him Out Again”

Plus, hear essential tracks from the late King Von, The Cool Kids, and Kool G Rap

baby tate sl*t him out again rap song of the week
Baby Tate, photo by Scrill Davis
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    Rap Song of the Week is a new music feature breaking down the essential hip-hop tracks you need to hear. Check out the full playlist here. This week, Baby Tate shares her ode to sexual freedom, “Sl*t Him Out Again.”


    Nicki Minaj, Cardi B, and Megan Thee Stallion are three of the biggest names in music, but being a woman in hip-hop hasn’t gotten much easier. Just ask the ass-kicking Rico Nasty, who was treated disrespectfully by fans while opening for Playboi Carti without any support from the headliner.

    Unfortunately, chances are fellow rising star Baby Tate will have to deal with a similar disappointment at some point, but on paper at least, the Georgia native is well acquainted with self-affirmation, as heard on her late 2020 breakout “I Am.”

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    And with songs like “Sl*t Him Out Again” (the remix to February’s “Sl*t Him Out”), Baby Tate takes pride in turning the male gaze on its head. Thanks to trailblazing forebearers like Trina, Lil’ Kim, and Nicki, the 25-year-old rapper and singer isn’t shy about demanding that her needs be met in the bedroom, with her lover’s wants coming second or hell, maybe even third.

    Declaring “ménage ain’t just for him” isn’t new, but I’m pretty sure no one else has rapped this nonchalantly about “forcing” a dude to taste his own cum: “Gargle on his kids, then spit ’em in his mouth.” Not that there’s anything wrong with that, of course. It’s not a one-sided situation, either, as Tate likes to get a little freaky herself. “I like to get messy, ain’t nobody scared of a lil’ skeet,” she raps. “Buss it on my face, they say, “Nut keep that skin clean.'”

    Along for the ride is fellow George rapper Kali, who’s double the trouble — equally adept with women and men. “Heard she got a n****, put my pussy in her mouth/ I can take your n**** or your bitch, fuck that house,” she boasts. The collaboration is just the latest instance of Tate working with other female artists — living up to the precedent she set with 2019’s GIRLS.

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    Maybe that’s what it’ll take for more women to find support within an especially misogynist genre. Rather than depending on men to do what’s right, Tate and so many other talented rappers will just have to build a space of their own.

    Speaking of which, catch Baby Tate on the road as an opener for Charli XCX’s North American tour starting later this month. She’ll also be playing Rolling Loud Miami in July; grab your tickets here.


    Honorable Mentions:

    King Von feat. Lil Durk – “Evil Twins”

    King Von’s new posthumous album What It Means to Be King feels like a celebration of late Chicago rapper rather than an empty cash grab, with the guest verses complimenting the rhymes he left behind instead of merely filling in the gaps. Already popular on TikTok before its release, “Evil Twins” sounds like it could’ve been made before he was fatally shot in 2020, as Von and his mentor trade chilling lyrics about their rivals over an ominous drill beat.

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    The Cool Kids feat. Guapdad 4000 – “IM COMING OVER THERE”

    Since their come-up in the blog era, The Cool Kids have been purveyors of stylish, futuristic hip-hop. More than a decade later, their sound is just as fresh. Bay Area rapper Guapdad 4000 fits the Neptunes-esque production of “IM COMING OVER THERE” like a glove as he teams with the Chicago duo in the quest for a perfect hook-up situation.

    Joey Bada$$ – “Head High”

    Produced by hip-hop traditionalist Statik Selektah, Joey Bada$$ calls “Head High” one of the “best, purest, and realest songs,” he’s ever made. Rappers make these kinds of statements all the time, but digging up memories of the people he’s lost — including the late XXXTentacion (“Shit, I could talk about any type of stuff with him/ Never gave a fuck about who didn’t fuck with him”) — meant going into the darkest of places.

    The Alchemist and Kool G Rap – “Diesel”

    Mafioso rap pioneer Kool G Rap created a blueprint for modern hip-hop with internal rhyme schemes and a technical, yet effortless flow. It’s impossible not to marvel at hearing him slice through a soul-sampling beat from our 2021 Producer of the Year The Alchemist, with a first verse that manages to rhyme “grown image” with “Stonehenges” and “methadone clinics.” What the actual fuck?

    Paul Wall & Termanology – “Recognize My Car”

    One of the faces of Southern hip-hop’s mainstream breakthrough in the 2000s, Paul Wall’s undeniable lyricism on songs like Kanye West’s “Drive Slow” was unfortunately overshadowed by his trademark grills and smooth, baritone delivery. On “Recognize My Car,” New York legend Pete Rock’s beat updates the familiar Houston sound with his unmistakable horns, lacing Wall with a soundtrack for his “Cadillac flow” before making way for Termanology.

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