Advertisement

With Crash, Charli XCX Seamlessly Blends Every Era of Charli XCX

The fifth studio album from Charli XCX is her most straightforward and nostalgic mix yet

crash review charli xcx
Charli XCX, photo by Emily Lipson
Advertisement
Advertisement

    An album named Crash conjures a few images to the mind; namely a mechanical collision of sorts, an explosion, or a destructive impact. Charli XCX represents these images appropriately on the album cover for her fifth studio album, Crash, out today (March 18th). In the photo, she poses on top of a car with a cracked windshield, blood streaming down her face, and a fierce, hungry gaze that dares you to put your foot on the gas.

    You’d think an album by Charli XCX titled Crash would sound like a crash, in both a literal and metaphorical sense — Charli has consistently blended multiple styles, eras, and genres into one swirling, dizzying pop cocktail. 2020’s how i’m feeling now was a further foray into hyperpop’s undisputed dominance as an ingredient in contemporary pop, and amid its frenetic, detailed approach, Charli was more open than she had ever been.

    With Crash, it’d be easy for Charli to continue advancing upon the experimental ideas that characterized the mixed bag-approach of how i’m feeling now, 2019’s Charli and 2017’s Pop 2 and Number 1 Angel.

    Advertisement

    And yet, Crash is Charli’s most straightforward album yet—it is the sound of an artist being incredibly precise and specific about her relationship to pop music as a whole, and using her decade of experience in the industry to create a deeply enjoyable, indestructible record. Crash seems to blend every era of Charli, but not in a jagged, experimental way—instead, the album is seamless, wholly accessible, and in conversation with the biggest pop stars of the last 40 years.

    Nostalgia initially played a much larger role in Charli’s earlier albums, harkening back to the ‘80s keytar bombast of New Wave pop stars combined with a uniquely 2010s sense of brashness and abandon. But as Charli began to focus her sonic development on the future, those nostalgic impulses took the backseat in favor of the novel, the postmodern, and her identity as pop’s chief curator and collaborator.

    Advertisement

Personalized Stories

Around The Web

Advertisement