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Mac Miller Drug Dealer Sentenced to 11 Years in Prison

The sentencing followed Miller's mother sharing a heartfelt statement with the court

mac miller drug dealer sentenced 11 years prison reavis middle man guilty
Mac Miller, photo by Christian Weber
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    Ryan Michael Reavis, one of three men implicated in the overdose death of Mac Miller, has been sentenced to 10 years and 11 months in prison, Rolling Stone reports.

    Reavis, 39, was accused of being the middle man between Stephen Andrew Walter, who has pleaded guilty to selling counterfeit oxycodone laced with fentanyl, and Cameron James Pettit, who supplied the pills to Mac Miller. The rapper was found dead on September 6th, 2018 of a lethal combination of fentanyl, cocaine, and alcohol.

    Before his sentencing, Reavis addressed the court, saying he didn’t know the pills had been responsible for Miller’s death until he was arrested a year later in September of 2019. “This is not just a regular drug case,” he said. “Somebody died, and a family is never going to get their son back. My family would be wrecked if it was me. They’d never be all right, never truly get over it. I think about that all the time. And I know that whatever happens today, I’m the lucky one because my family is here and I’m here and I’ll be with them again. I feel terrible. This is not who I am. My perspective has changed. My heart has changed.”

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    Reavis had asked for only five years in custody as part of his plea agreement. In arguing for a longer sentence, prosecutors submitted text messages that the defendant had sent to a colleague. Using a slang term for oxycodone, “blues,” he wrote, “People have been dying from fake blues left and right, you better believe law enforcement is using informants and undercover[s] to buy them on the street [so] they can start putting ppl in prison for life for selling fake pills.”

    Assistant U.S. Attorney Elia Herrera said this proved that Reavis was aware the pills could be deadly, and that he was more worried about legal consequences for himself. “Defendant knew that people were dying from fake blues left and right. He knew that people were being put away in prison for life for dealing them. Defendant was not worried about people dying left and right. He was worried about getting caught,” Herrera said.

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