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Gogol Bordello Break Down New Album SOLIDARITINE Track by Track: Exclusive

How the Ukrainian punkers incorporated Fugazi, Woody Guthrie, and more into their new album

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Gogol Bordello Solidaritine track by track new album stream
Gogol Bordello Track by Track, photo by Sanjay Suchak

    Track by Track is our recurring feature series that gives artists a space to take us through every song on their latest release. Today, Ukrainian punks Gogol Bordello break down SOLIDARITINE.


    Ukrainian punk rockers Gogol Bordello return with the group’s eighth studio album, SOLIDARITINE, today (September 16th). Delivering furious punk songs with a distinct Eastern European touch, the band remains veracious, creative, and honest.

    The 13 tracks of SOLIDARITINE pull no punches. Taking swings at injustice, intolerance, and crypto bros, the album is rooted in classic punk tradition: say what you mean and say it loud. With a Fugazi cover, Social Distortion references, and an appearance from H.R. of Bad Brains, Gogol Bordello’s mission is well-studied and seemingly endorsed by icons of the genre.

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    “Songwriting is a sacred craft and punk is a great place for it,” frontman Eugene Hütz tells Consequence. “For me, punk rock was always about that Woody Guthrie-ness: All you fascists are bound to lose! And also about that Fugazi-ness: never mind what’s been sellin’, it’s what you buying.”

    Yet, an undeniable streak of empathy runs through the project. Gogol Bordello expands on their rage with a plea — or perhaps more accurately, a demand — to love thy neighbor. The namesake for the album comes from an imaginary chemical that “unlocks our empathy and our full human potential.”

    “[It’s] supposed to unite us in overcoming our common problems,” Hütz explains. “It’s kind of a brother of Adrenaline, or at least it rhymes with it. So, shots of Solidaritine for everyone in Gogol house and let’s go!”

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    The sentiment results in righteous anger, a rage that holds the moral high ground — and it’s all presented with the type of energy that can only be derived from brotherhood.

    Listen to Gogol Bordello’s SOLIDARITINE below, followed by Eugene Hütz’s Track by Track breakdown. The band is also headed out on tour; you can pick up tickets via Ticketmaster.


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